Tag Archives: Anne Rice

What Are the 10 Most Influential Books in Your Life?

If you’re like me, it’s difficult to narrow down all the books you’ve read to just ten that have influenced you. However, I think I’ve come up with a pretty good list. Take a peak and let’s see if we have any of the same!

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  1. Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice
    This was my first real introduction to vampires, and it has stayed with me ever since. I’ve consciously and subconsciously compared all other versions of vampires to Anne Rice’s creations.

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    2. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
    I was in high school when I first read this; the gothic atmosphere, the loneliness, and Jane standing up for herself really spoke to me. I related to her character so much as an adolescent.

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3. Born to Run by Christopher McDougall
I’ve always loved running, and when I discovered this book, it was like magic. I was so engrossed by the novel that I wanted to go live with the Tarahumara Indians.

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4. Sabriel (trilogy) by Garth Nix
I rarely reread books. For me to do so, I have to (1) love the novel and (2) have forgotten how the book ended. Not so for this trilogy. First reading this in middle school, none of my classmates had heard of this series. But the worlds, magic, and characters in this dark fantasy series struck a cord with me. I wanted to be part of this story, and, even now, as an adult, I am always drawn back into the tale because of the fantastic writing and the maturity seen throughout the characters.

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5. Daughter of Smoke and Bone (trilogy) by Laini Taylor
This trilogy arrived at the perfect time for me. I was an undergraduate, and I was about to give up on young adult books forever. It seemed that each YA book I read was worse than the one before. The last YA book I read before this trilogy I nearly chucked across the room because of the ridiculousness of the characters. However, this trilogy saved YA books for me. I was immersed from page one. The creativity, the writing, and the pacing were spot on. When the story ended, I felt I’d lost a fantastic world and some phenomenal friends.

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6. Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling
I grew up on this series. Starting with my mom reading book one to my brother and I and ending with us fighting over who got to read book seven first (I won), this series holds a special place in my heart.

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7. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
I was interested in psychology before this novel, but after reading this I couldn’t learn enough about psychology. This book embodies the nature of humanity’s suffering and insecurities, and how, despite being able to take away a person’s life, you can’t take away his freedom.

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8. Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer
This novel was like a punch in the gut. It showed how unforgiving nature could be, how easily human life could be extinguished, how human error could turn to tragedy, and how one misstep meant death. It showed what the cost of accomplishing your dream meant, what it took to survive, and what it meant to be a survivor, knowing teammates and friends lost their lives, and wondering if there was anything more you could have done to prevent that.

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9. Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
This book goes back to elementary school, but I still own the copy my mom bought me all those years ago; and every time I think of the book or see the cover, I smile. It’s a story about an unusually selfless and caring girl, who transcends the bounds of conformity, while the boy who realizes that the girl’s “in touch with something that the rest of us are missing” and loves her, eventually shuns her, like the rest of the school, because he needs to be accepted by his peers.

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10. The Golden Goblet by Eloise Jarvis McGraw
Another book from elementary school, my fourth grade teacher gave me this novel as a Christmas gift—she left a personalized note in it and everything—because she knew of my love for ancient Egypt, and I think I was her favorite student… But I still have the copy she gave me, and it increased my adoration for ancient Egypt to an almost obsessive level.

What are the 10 books that most influenced you? List in the comments below!

(Photos courtesy of Brittany E. Krueger’s personal book collection.)

How to Write a Novel When You Don’t Have Time

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Often I hear about how people say they don’t have time to write. Their full time job, family, pets, etc. get in the way. I understand, and there are times when I believe that I have to choose between writing and working. However, even though I work full time, maintain a blog, participate in a critique group (which means spending time working on other people’s writing), exercise, and deal with the unpredictable speed bumps life chucks in everyone’s path, I somehow manage to write.

How is it possible to spend time writing, when you don’t have time to write?

Fight through the Sludge

Don’t allow yourself time off from writing. It’s easy to let one day off grow to two days, three days…until the time snowballs into weeks and then months. On the last day of my writing master’s thesis class, my professor told us that, once we step out of the classroom, most of us will never write again. More specifically, my professor was talking about how we wouldn’t write the genre/type of writing we’d just spent years working on to culminate in a novel/short story collection.

At first, I hadn’t believed my professor, but, after staying in contact with some of my classmates, I do. Many of them haven’t written anything creative since thesis…that was about 6 months ago, and, of those that have, they haven’t written much.

Their reason? Life got in the way.

Be Disciplined, Like a Samurai 

Writing a novel or short story takes time and effort. Anyone who writes knows that it’s not easy. Writing is exhausting. It uses a lot of brain energy, and it can be easy to come home from a long work day and just want to veg. I’ve done it. But writing is a skill, and every skill takes discipline.

One of the best ways to become disciplined is to be motivated. Motivation commits you to writing. Maybe a specific character in your story encourages you to write, because you have to tell that character’s tale. Perhaps you’re in a writing group and you’ve got deadlines to meet. Perchance you’re the type of person who’s motivated by visual stimuli. Create a writing space that you have to pass by on a daily basis. You could tape motivational quotes and pictures to the wall above your space.

Remember, as Robert Collier said, “Success is the sum of small efforts, repeated day in and day out.”

If you still think you never have time to write, here are some writers that became famous authors, while working full-time:

Anne Rice

Anne Rice wrote Interview with the Vampire, when she worked full-time as an insurance claims examiner and while she was grieving over the death of her 5 year old daughter.

Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll penned Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, while working. He continued to work, even as he became famous and earned enough money writing to be a full-time author. He taught at Christ Church until late in life, as well as being a mathematician and a photographer.

Bram Stoker

Bram Stoker worked as a civil servant at Dublin Castle for 10 years, while writing for the newspaper the Dublin Evening Mail. He went on to manage Sir Henry Irving’s production company/venue: the Lyceum Theatre. While working as the company’s manager, he wrote and had published his first horror story, and eventually published his most famous work Dracula in 1897. Stoker worked as Lyceum’s manager for about 30 years.

(Photo courtesy of Tony.)

Why You Write

 

I’ve always been interested in why people write. Words have the power to transport people away from the mundane. But that power takes work – a lot of work. Work that is hard, strenuous, and time-consuming. So, why do writers persist?

Ernest Hemingway said, “From things that had happened and from things as they exist and 8670899788_9760142056_zfrom all things that you know and all those you cannot know, you make something through your invention that is not a representation but a whole new thing truer than anything true and alive, and if you make it well enough, you give it immortality. That is why you write and for no other reason that you know of.”

Author of The House At The End Of The Road, Ralph Eubanks, stated, “There’s something both emotionally satisfying about it [writing], and something that is very physically satisfying when you finally see your work when it comes out in a finished book, or when you see the pages at the end of the day.”

Lord Byron said, “If I don’t write to empty my mind, I go mad.”

14519245613_ff8909e294_zWilliam Faulkner stated, “The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life, by artificial means and hold it fixed, so that a hundred years later, when a stranger looks at it, it moves again since it is life. Since man is mortal, the only immortality possible for him is to leave something behind him that is immortal since it will always move. This is the artist’s way of scribbling ‘Kilroy was here’ on the wall of the final and irrevocable oblivion through which he must someday pass.”

Cynthia MacGregor, author of Everybody Loves Bacon, said “It’s who I am. It’s what I love. I even write for fun on top of writing for a living. I couldn’t NOT write. I need to write like I need to breathe, to eat, it’s vital to me.”

Georges Simenon stated, “I think that if a man has the urge to be an artist, it is because he needs to find himself. Every writer has to find himself through his characters, through all his writing.”15413112213_f50271ca5d_z

Author of Band Fags!, Frank Anthony Polito, said, “I write because there is nothing else I can do – well. For many years I was an actor.”

Joan Didion stated, “In many ways writing is the act of saying I, of imposing oneself upon other people, of saying listen to me, see it my way, change your mind. It’s an aggressive, even hostile act. You can disguise its aggressiveness all you want…but there’s no getting around the fact that setting words on paper is a tactic of a secret bully, an invasion, an imposition of the writer’s sensibility on the reader’s most private space.”

Didion also said, “I write entirely to find out what I’m thinking, what I’m looking at, what I see and what it means. What I want and what I fear.”

Anne Rice stated, “Writers write about what obsesses them. You draw those cards. I lost my mother when I was 14. My daughter died at the age of 6. I lost my faith as a Catholic. When I’m writing, the darkness is always there. I go where the pain is.”453831774_06c67eb3aa_z

She also said, “I loved words. I love to sing them and speak them and even now, I must admit, I have fallen into the joy of writing them.”

Gloria Steinem stated, “Writing is the only thing that, when I do it, I don’t feel I should be doing something else.”

Neil Gaiman said, “The best thing about writing fiction is that moment where the story catches fire and comes to life on the page, and suddenly it all makes sense and you know what it’s about and why you’re doing it and what these people are saying and doing, and you get to feel like both the creator and the audience. Everything is suddenly both obvious and surprising…and it’s magic and wonder and strange.”

I write for so many reasons; it’s a mishmash of the quotes listed above. But in my own words, I write the stories in my head that won’t leave me alone. They’re ever-present, and will only quiet once they’re down on paper and satisfied with the way they’re written.

Why do you write?

(Photos courtesy of Thomas Hawk, Visit Mississippi, MaxGag, and Stephen.)