Why Did You Become a Writer?

4549909730_a513381ed7_oRecently, someone asked me why I became a writer. When I went to answer, I found myself stumped. It wasn’t because I didn’t know why I was a writer. Writing is part of my identity. It’s part of who I am. But, trying to find a way to articulate this to a non-writer caught me off guard.

I’ve had more than one experience where I told someone I was a writer, and they’d respond by asking me what I’d published. Today, I can point to research papers, online articles for various companies, and a literary journal. However, even with those publications, many non-writers aren’t all that impressed with my writing record. This is even more apparent when they find out that though I’m a fiction writer, I don’t yet have a published novel.

I’ve even had family members—these members are in the minority—who tell me that they still have dreams too, but they say that as if dreams never do come true. It can make me feel like I’m a little kid, who’s getting a pat on the head by a chuckling parent.

I think of all those authors out there, who many would have never believed would become famous writers.

Stephen King has published over fifty novels, including Carrie, The Shining, and Doctor Sleep. King is world famous. But before he got published, he was a high school janitor. Who would have imagined that a janitor would get to where King is now?

John Green, author of The Fault in Our Stars, Looking for Alaska, and more, was working on becoming a minister. It was during his time serving as a children’s hospital chaplain that he was inspired to write The Fault in Our Stars.

Nicholas Sparks, author of the renowned bestseller, The Notebook, as well as numerous other novels, worked various small jobs before he became a famous author. One of those jobs was cold-calling people to sell them dental products.

J.K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter series, went from being depressed and on welfare to one of the richest people in the world in five years.

There are so many more examples out there. When I think of these authors, the question of why I became a writer is all the more clear. I was always a writer. I wrote skits and plays in elementary school, attempted my first book in middle school, and wrote my first novel in high school. Were these early attempts good? No. But I’ve kept at it, taking courses, reading, and getting a master’s in writing.

I can’t imagine my life without writing. Story ideas and characters bombard me; I have to write about these fictional people and worlds. I hope to one day be published, and I’m not going to give up…I will get published.

But regardless of being published or not, I’m a writer because I can’t live without it. I can’t image living without telling about the worlds and characters that won’t let me sleep at night, that make me not realize the red light has changed to green, or that have me space out mid-conversation.

When someone asks me why I became a writer, I say that I didn’t become a writer. I’ve always been one.

Why are you a writer?

(photo courtesy of Dave Morrison Photography.)

 

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2 thoughts on “Why Did You Become a Writer?

  1. Anne

    I write because I am … not complete without writing. I never travel without a notebook at hand; my desk is piled high with snippets of half-finished stories; I have two novels that have provided me with great satisfaction – although they have not ventured ‘outdoors’ even to test the waters.

    Reply

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